Cubitts
Cubitts
GIVING A NEW PERSPECTIVE TO THE WORLD OF SPECTACLES
Branding  Visual Identity  Packaging  

When we say we worked with Cubitts from the very start, we mean our first conversation with founder, Tom Broughton, began with his words “I’ve got this idea…”.

A self-confessed spectacle addict, Tom wanted to create something very special with Cubitts; a stylish, artisan led approach to buying spectacles without the complexities or price tag.


We were brought on board to create an identity capable of seamlessly transcending web to workshop, product to promotion.

Over the years, as the success of Cubitts has grown, so has their number of stores that can be found carefully dotted around the Capital. Each store has its own unique identity, though the logotype remains the consistent mark on all instances.

Focused on heritage


Anchoring Cubitts in London, in particular King’s Cross, became a key part of the identity process. We spent time with Cubitts, walking the streets and observing their architectural influences, that would later become such an integral part of the identity. Inspired by the wrought-iron butterfly rivets found outside Lewis Cubitt’s Granary, we created an identity rich in heritage with strong geographical and architectural ties.

The original badge in the logo was based upon the shape of an iron rivet, extruded and split to form a connection with the letterforms KX, a well-known shorthand for the area of King's Cross.

References to the rivet shape and the rivet badge were integrated into much of the brand collateral, as well as featuring on various places on the spectacles over the years.

Bespoke typography


To create the original Cubitts text we developed a bespoke typeface with the rivets once again at the heart of the inspiration, forming very angular and obvious serifs. The typeface was based upon an existing typeface, widely used for street signage around London – giving a clear nod to the geography of the brand. The result was something deliberately industrial. Tall, condensed letterforms and generous letter-spacing gave a sense of refinement.